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20121226
20130103
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
down the hatches. >> i'm sorry, jim, i'm going to stop the subsidy to pbs. >> i like pbs, i love big bird. >> they brought us binders full of women. >> big bird. >> horses and bayonets. >> oh yeah ♪ ♪ >> i just called president obama to congratulate him. >> i congratulated him and paul ryan on a hard-fought campaign. >> i pray that the president will be successful in guiding our nation. >> we are an american family, and we rise or fall together. the task of perfecting our union moving forward. >> tonight, we are celebrating the year in the news, the winners, the losers, the person of the year. and we will hand out the donald trump award. all right, let's start with the most valuable player of 2012, alex wagner. >> in my book, it is david, you saw the beginnings, with dean, and obama. >> krystal? the most valuable player? >> probably to waiter who placed the camera at the mitt romney fundraiser and captured the 47% comments, which i think showed a lot of people their concerns about mitt romney and the fact he really was not there for all of america. that he didn't understand the p
ambassadors and jim pinkerton and fox news political analyst. juan williams. i'm jon scott. fox news watch is on right now. >> we can now definitively say that president barack obama will be re-elected, mitt romney will come up a loser in this race. >> jon: the billing media story of the year, the presidential election. that was how it ended. barack obama beating mitt romney and an end to a bitter season that started early with the g.o.p. primaries and events like this. >> we saw some of this black church in south carolina where a woman asked you why you referred a president obama as the food stamp president. it sounds as if you are suitcase to go belittle people. >> first of all, juan, the fact is that more people have been put on food stamps by barack obama than any president in american history. [ cheers and applause ] >> i know among the political kli correct and i'm supposed to you use facts that are uncomfortable. [ laughter ] >> so that was just part of a long and memorable primary season. juan, is that your highlight of the year. [ laughter ] >> my highlight? it is telling again fo
, the migration, jim crow, the depression and that all their steps forward and steps backward reflect if of who we are. so i think i thought about it like that. >> actually i was wondering if you thought of it as a smaller project? in other words not that you would not have to put in context the individuals that make family tree and some of whom we see scrolling behind us but it strikes me in the writing of the book that it contained a social history, that it was a black wife, broke -- both rural urban, southern sweeping and it was intimate. i was just wondering, did that scale happen as a result of the actual research when you put pen to paper fingertip to keyboard and you thought, this is much more than i thought it would be when i set out to do this? >> i think that i always had an idea that her family was reflect that, but you are right that when you are in it it becomes something else. one of the things that actually is a practical matter as a writer which became clear to me is that when you are digging back this far you don't have the voices that you need to bring the story to life. and some
on for years in iowa. my former colleague, jim leach and i had written about that. it is happening in california, arizona, and even a little in florida. that is part of the problem, because democrats, nationally, got more than 1 million more votes than republicans who ran for the house of representatives. yet they come into this with a 35-vote margin. there are some areas where in north carolina there were more votes for democrats than republicans, but there are only 27% of the representatives are democrats. that is part of the problem. it confuses the notion about mandates. after all, the allwon decisively. -- the president won decisively. the senate pickup ground. it does not sound like much of a national mandate to continue the policies of the republicans over the last decade or so. host: david is our next caller in ohio, republican. caller: good morning. being a regular person on a budget, i can only get the things i can pay for. i would love to be able to buy erraris or newr ou houses or all kinds of things they would love to have. due to my budget, i am not able to do that. t
of the democrats who voted no is virginia congressman jim moran who's with me now. thank you for being here. charles krauthammer said on the right this was a route for the ds. you disagree. >> normally when the far right and far left are in agreement, the middle makes the most sense. but not in this case. i think this is a very bad long-term deal for democratic priorities and thus for the president. because what we did was to take $3.9 trillion off the table permanently and set up three more fiscal cliffs over the next three months. the sequester, the debt ceiling, then the expiration of the appropriations bills. which will happen in march. and what it does is to say we will never bring in more than 15% of gdp. but we have never had a robust economy when federal spending wasn't about 20% of gdp. because you need that investment in research and innovation and education and skills training and so on. and what's going to happen is that interest on the debt is going to be greater than any of the programs that provide that kind of seed corn investment in our children's future. so that's what we
living under a jim crow system. now, we are talking about those born in 1994. it doesn't seem like very long ago. that's 34 years after the 1964 civil rights act. according to the latest census, one in four americans describe themselves as being something other than black. african-americans are not the largest minority group anymore. they have not been for a while. latinos are a larger minority group. neither one of them is the fastest growing racial minority group. the fastest growing one is asian american. white americans are growing only had a 5.7% rate. another rapidly growing group of people like our president. who could check more than one box in the race and ethnicity section of their questionnaire. it seems to me that we cannot have a legal regime that sorts people according to their skin color and what country their ancestors came from. and treat some people better and other people worse based on what boxley check. okay? now, frequently the people who are arguing in favor, and i think this issue all the time, let me tell you. two minutes and today we are not talking about the e
to the most important moments. slavery, a civil war, and emancipation, migration, jim crow, a depression, and all the steps forward and back were reflected of who we are. >> host: did you think of it as a smaller project? not to put it in context the individuals of the family tree but it became a social history of rural and urban urban, a southern and northern sweeping, intimate. did that scale have been as a result of their research with pen to paper and fought this is much more than i thought? >> guest: alloys had an idea her family was reflective but when you are in it, it becomes something else. as a practical matter when you dig back this is far you don't have the voices you need to bring the story to life. people say what about letters and journals? if people were barred from writing and reading those records geneticist and historical records do not capture as much. i knew i had to get extemporaneous characters to bring it to life. i do not think about leaving those stories of the people of the time. >> host: you did a very good job. [laughter] one review did make light that you we
election reporting for "the new york times" magazine and in talking to jim messina, campaign manager of the obama campaign, david axelrod, robert emanuel and ascii none, how the next four years under an obama presidency given that the house composition before less the same. >> most certainly going to be similar. >> uniformly very unfair, and other verses as a talking point, with the fever will break, that the american people as they vote for president obama for another four years will basically be voting against obstructionism. republicans would get the message and walk in a fashion towards the center. >> i can't see that happening at all. >> that's their talking point. >> are you any more optimistic? governor romney is supposed to the president being reenacted that their son joe waiting for him after he gets into office? >> now, i'm not. i wrote a story for "the new york times" magazine on governor romney and specifically his time as governor day. about three weeks ago or so. the basic piece concludes is i interviewed a number of people and particularly the more conservative house r
and progressive, and they, they were deeply anti-segregationist and anti-jim crow. and they built in the raleigh/durham/chapel hill area something called the research triangle that depended a lot on education, on higher education and which has really paid huge dividends and, in a way, opened the road to the new south as we think of it today. my father would have been, in 2008, would have been so fiercely proud to see barack obama elected in north carolina, to see the country, to see the state go for barack obama. sadly, it wasn't to happen again in 2012, although we worked really hard at it. but anyway, my first, my first campaign that i actively was involved with was mcgovern in '72, and i think my wife kim still has the pumper sticker that says -- the bumper sticker that says don't blame me, i'm from massachusetts. [laughter] i think massachusetts was the only state to go for mcgovern sadly. [laughter] but kim also took a year off from, between high school and college and rang doorbells and called people up for that as a field office hand there in upstate new york. but that was, i worked with
, and machine kay and jim a's mom, and that is all for now. alex returns here on wednesday on noon eastern, 9:00 a.m. pacific, and she'll be joined by rnc chair, meeblg steele, e sfwl ra clean, the "new york times" hugo lindgren, times rona, and norm ornstein of the american enterprise institute. can you follow alsxex now at facebook.com/now with alex. andrea mitchell reports next with chris sitting in for andrea, and will he have the president's live remarks on the fiscal cliff. good afternoon to you, chris. >> hello, joy. thank you very much. coming up, are we close to a deal? president obama will speak in about 30 minutes. we'll have it live. also joining us delaware senator chris kuhns, jack kingston and maryland democratic congressman elijah cummings talking about the cliff and the deal, maybe. we're also live at new york's presbyterian hospital with the latest on secretary of state hillary clinton's condition. andrea mitchell reports is next. we can afford to take an extra trip this year. first boston... then san francisco. hotwire checks the competitions' rates every day so they can gu
do. >>> it was a wild ride to election day 2012. jim acosta has the top ten campaign stories of the year. >> reporter: the year started off with a surprise in a sweater vest, counting down the top campaign stories of the year, number ten, the primaries. rick santorum's stunning performance in the iowa caucuses. >> game on. >> reporter: kicked off a battle for the republican nomination that few in washington had expected. the gop's odds on favorite, mitt romney stumbled in some of the early contests. he refused to release his tax returns allowing newt gingrich to take south carolina. >> we proved here in south carolina that people of power beats big money. >> reporter: but that big money eventually cleared the field and romney set his sights on the president. >> it's still about the economy and we're not stupid. >> reporter: at number nine, bain. not that one. that one. almost as soon as romney had had locked up the nomination, his former private investment capital was crashed by the super pac and obama campaign. the attack ads put romney on defense for months. the president a
for this country. host: we move on to jim in fort myers, fla. caller: thank you for taking my call. what is your suggestions to solve these problems? are you still for the electoral college system? how will you improve the campaign financing? i would like to hear what you thought after all of your research. guest: there are a few different ways to go. i do not advocate a particular policy position, but there are some implications. in terms of fund-raising, it is a result of low contribution limits, with rapidly rising campaign costs. if you favor the public system, you will want to revamp its note it offers a larger pool -- so it offers a larger pool to opt in. that would limit the amount of time presidents have to campaign. you might see the problem is the contribution limit. contribution limits on the amount of money you can give are small relative to the amount of money it takes to run a campaign. you might say to raise the contribution limits. with the electoral college, if it were abolished and we elect our presidents through a national popular vote, you could have a lively debate. voters i
jim bunning, objected to the extension of unemployment benefits. we wanted to extend them for literally millions of americans and he stood on his desk on the republican side and said i object. and then sat down. that was tend of the story. that was really the end of the debate. and so i went to the floor and i said i just want to give society notice to the senator from kentucky i'm going to renew that request every half so he'd better return to the floor because he has to object every time. and this was late at night. and we mobilized a number of people in the cloakroom and came to the floor and kept it going and finally he got up and complained he was missing the university of kentucky basketball game on television because of this. and i thought several million people are missing unemployment benefits because of this, too. so that is in the nature of what you're trying to achieve. if there is something important enough to stop the course of the senate activity, to stop the business of the senate, then you should be prepared to be on the floor and argue your case. and brin
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)